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Resources for Participants

 
"A DUI is not the end of the world, but we hope it is the end of driving impaired. "
Jim Claiborne, Utah Prime For Life Instructor
 

Resources for Prime For Life® and PRIME Solutions® Participants

Participants who have attended a Prime For Life class or a Prime Solutions treatment program often visit our website to find out more about the history and research behind the prevention and treatment programs.

To assist you further, we’ve gathered together this list of links to organizations that provide support and information about drugs and alcohol.

While we cannot be responsible for the accuracy of the content of these other sites, they are official and/or very popular resources that we have found to be helpful. We also do not actively endorse these organizations–they are provided as resources that have been beneficial to individuals, and families of those individuals, with drug and alcohol problems.

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

What: A worldwide 12-step fellowship for anyone who wants to achieve and maintain sobriety. Membership is anonymous and self-supported through members' voluntary contributions.
Who: Anyone who would like to overcome his or her drinking problems. Men and women share their experiences, strength and emotional support to recover from alcohol addiction.
Link: www.aa.org

AA for Black and African Americans

What: This pamphlet includes personal stories from African Americans of finding sobriety.
Download: Pamphlet

AA and the Gay/Lesbian Alcoholic

What: This pamphlet includes personal excerpts from sober gay and lesbians.
For: Gay, lesbian and transgendered individuals with a desire to overcome alcohol addiction.
Download: Pamphlet

AA for Native North Americans

What: This pamphlet includes personal stories shared by Native Americans with substance addiction.
For: Native Americans who have the desire to overcome addiction.
Download: Pamphlet

A.A. for the People with Special Needs

What: This pamphlet includes the experience of AA members who are hearing and visually impaired, housebound chronically ill or disabled due to brain damage or stroke.
For: Individuals who are hearing and visually impaired or chronically ill and have the desire to live a new and productive life free from alcohol.
Download: Pamphlet

AA for Women

What: Pamphlet includes personal stories about experiences of women who have alcohol addiction.
Who: For women of any age who would like to overcome alcohol addiction.
Download: Pamphlet

Cocaine Anonymous (CA)

What: A support group to help people recover from cocaine or crack addiction. Membership is anonymous.
For: Anyone with a desire to overcome his or her addiction to cocaine or crack.
Link: www.ca.org

Crystal Meth Anonymous

What: A 12-step fellowship program to help people recover from crystal meth addiction.
For: Men and women who have a desire to overcome crystal meth addiction.
Link: www.crystalmeth.org

Marijuana Anonymous

What: A support program to help people recover from marijuana addiction.
For: Anyone who has the desire to overcome marijuana addiction. Membership is anonymous.
Link: www.marijuana-anonymous.org

NAADAC – The National Association of Addiction Professionals 

What: A professional association of counselors specializing in addictions.  The link below provides an opportunity to locate NAADAC associated counselors in your area. (Please note: Prevention Research Institute provides this link as a service and neither recommends nor endorses any particular counselor or the processes they may use in treatment.)
Who: Those seeking local substance abuse counselors.
Link:  http://www.naadac.org    

Narcotics Anonymous (NA)

What: Modeled after Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous is a 12-step program geared specifically toward overcoming an addiction to drugs. Membership is anonymous.
Who: Anyone with a desire to overcome drug addiction.
Link: www.na.org

Native American Indian General Service Office of Alcoholics Anonymous (NAIGSO-AA)

What: A 12-step fellowship for Native American Indians. The service offers an inmate correspondence program that connects with Native American alcoholics who are incarcerated. Membership is anonymous.
For: Native Americans who have the desire to stop alcohol addiction.
Link: www.naigso-aa.org

Celebrate Recovery

What: Celebrate Recovery is a Christian recovery program based on Biblical principles. It incorporates the 12 Steps of AA with Scriptural references and adds 8 principles based on the Beatitudes.
For: Those who want a specifically Christian environment for their recovery process; offered in churches in the United States and abroad.
Link: www.celebraterecovery.com

Secular Organizations for Sobriety (SOS)

What: SOS is an alternative recovery method for those alcoholics or drug addicts who are uncomfortable with the spiritual content of widely available 12-Step programs. It is not opposed to or in competition with any other recovery programs. SOS encourages the use of the scientific method to understand alcoholism.
For: Anyone who would like to take a non-spiritually based approach to recovery.
Link: Secular Organizations for Sobriety

SMART Recovery

What: SMART Recovery is a self-empowering addiction recovery support group. Participants learn tools for addiction recovery based on the latest scientific research and participate in a world-wide comunity that includes free, science-based mutual help groups.
For: Those seeking recovery and an alternative to 12-Step self-help groups; offered in either face-to-face or online settings.
Link:  http://www.smartrecovery.org/

Women for Sobriety

What: Women for Sobriety is the first national self-help program for women with alcoholism.  It is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping women overcome alcohlism and other additctions.
For: Women seeking a self-help group that is designed by and for women to address the unique perspective and needs of women seeking recovery. 
Link:  http://womenforsobriety.org

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs - Mental Health/Substance Abuse

What: a service of the VA, this website provides information on substance abuse for veterans and their families with an anonymous screening questionnaire and links to services for those who feel they need help and support. The "Programs and Services" tab also provides a "Service Locator" link.
For: Those qualifying for Veterans benefits and their families.
Link:  http://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/substanceabuse.asp

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs - National Center for PTSD

What: a service of the VA, this website provides information on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and PTSD with Substance Use Disorder (SUD). In addition to general information on PTSD this webpage provides links to help locate both PTSD and SUD programs for Veterans.
For: Those qualifying for Veterans benefits and their families.
Link:  http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/problems/ptsd_substance_abuse_veterans.asp

For Family And Friends

Addiction by a family member affects the whole family. This support program is made up of individuals who have been affected by a family member who has substance abuse, regardless of whether that person is still using.

Al-Anon

What: A 12-step recovery support group that serves family and friends of individuals with alcohol addiction. Membership is anonymous.
For: Family and friends of individuals with alcohol addiction.
Link: Al-Anon

Alateen

What: An extension of Al-Anon Family Groups, Alateen is a fellowship of Al-Anon young adults and teens whose lives have been affected by someone else's drinking. Membership is anonymous.
For: Teens and young adults with a family member who has alcohol addiction.
Link: Alateen

Nar-Anon

What: A worldwide 12-step recovery support that is similar to Al-Anon, but is for friends or family of drug addicts. Membership is anonymous.
For: Family and friends of individuals with drug addiction.
Link: Nar-Anon

Narateen

What: An extension of Nar-Anon, Narateen is designed for Nar-Anon members in their teens. Membership is anonymous.
For: Teens and young adults with a family member who has drug addiction.
Link: Narateen

What to Do If Your Teen or Young Adult Has a Drug Problem

What: This is an article from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) with information on recognizing the signs of alcohol or drug problems in teens and adults and what to do about it.
For: Parents, family and friends of those who may be harmfully involved with alcohol or drugs.
Link: What to Do if Your Teen or Young Adult has a Problem with Drugs

Other Online National Resources

Alcohol Research Group

What: Alcohol Research Group (ARG) conducts and disseminates high-quality research in epidemiology of alcohol consumption and problems including alcohol use disorders, alcohol-related health services research, and analyses of alcohol policy and its impacts. ARG's mission focuses on better understanding the public health implications of alcohol use patterns and associated problems.  In addition, it trains future generations of researchers interested in the field of alcohol studies.
For: Those wishing to access current information on rates of alcohol consumption and problems in the United States. 
Link:  http://arg.org/

National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD)

What:  This site provides general information to help understand alcoholism and drug addiction.
For: General public, addiction professionals, educators, those seeking information and resources to address addiction.
Link:  https://www.ncadd.org/about-addiction/drugs/understanding-addiction

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

What: NIAAA is one of the 27 institutes and centers that comprise the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIAAA supports and conducts research on the impact of alcohol use on human health and well-being. It is the largest funder of alcohol research in the world.
Link: http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

What: Find information for people struggling with drug abuse, as well as resources for their families and friends.
Link: http://www.drugabuse.gov/patients-families

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) for Teens

What: a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This website was developed by NIDA to educate adolescents ages 11 through 15, their parents and their teachers, on the science behind drug abuse.
For: Parents, teachers, and adolescents between 11-15.
Link: http://teens.drugabuse.gov